Posts Tagged ‘salve’

Cayenne Salve…

by guest, Rosalee de la Forêt

 

One of the reasons why exploring herbalism is so much fun is that it goes beyond book work and theory to become more practical and hands on. Herbalism inspires us to get into our kitchens to make powerful herbal remedies.

Exploring herbs in this hands-on fashion also allows us to use our senses when learning about herbs. One of the most important senses in herbalism is our sense of taste.

There are five categories or tastes in herbal medicine: pungent, salty, sour, bitter and sweet.

Even though this recipe isn’t necessarily about tasting an herb, this recipe explores the qualities of the pungent taste. Pungent herbs are hot and stimulating. They get things moving!

cayenne-salve 

Cayenne salve stimulates blood flow, which can decrease pain. Cayenne also blocks substance P, the neuropeptide that can relay the pain signal. This salve can be used externally on arthritic pain, neuropathic pain and old achy injuries.

 

The following recipe is part of the upcoming Taste of Herbs Course.

What you’ll need…

  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • two heaping teaspoons of cayenne powder (or 15 grams)
  • 1/2 ounce of beeswax
  • double boiler
  • cheesecloth

Begin by infusing the cayenne into the olive oil over a double boiler. I heat the oil and cayenne until it is warm, turn off the heat and let it sit (warmly) for about 20 minutes, then turn the heat on again. I do this for at least one hour to a couple of hours; you could do it for 24 hours if desired.

Once the cayenne and olive oil have been infused, strain off the powder through a cheesecloth. Reserve the infused oil.

Heat the beeswax until it is melted. Stir in the infused oil until the beeswax and oil have been thoroughly melted together and combined.

Immediately pour this mixture into jars or tins (it makes roughly 4 ounces). Let it cool and then label it.

 

Using your cayenne salve

This cayenne salve can be used on aches and pains, from sore muscles and joints to bruises and even nerve pain. It is best for closed wounds and may sting a bit on open wounds. Even on closed skin you may feel a bit of burning or heat in the area where it is used. It should be applied externally only and used within 6 months for the best results.

If using it for arthritic pain it may take up to a week or two to see results. In this case you want to use it daily to decrease chronic pain.

Caution: When cayenne comes in contact with your mucosal membranes or eyes it will burn! Be sure to wash your hands thoroughly after touching cayenne or use gloves to apply the salve to the desired area. If you are using the cayenne salve on your hands, consider applying it at night and then sleeping with gloves on.

Some people with thin or sensitive skin may find that cayenne salve causes blistering. If this happens, stop use until it heals, then resume using a smaller amount, or remake the salve using less cayenne.

 

This recipe is an excerpt from the upcoming course, Taste of Herbs. Taste is an amazing way to learn HOW herbs work.

Rosalee created the Taste of Herbs Flavor Wheel to help people learn herbalism using their sense of Taste.

Get the free Taste of Herbs Flavor Wheel here.

 flavorwheel2

 

 

***Rosalee de la Forêt is the creator of Taste of Herbs, a new course by LearningHerbs and Mountain Rose Herbs. Rosalee is a clinical herbalist, herbal educator and founder of Herbal Remedies Advice.
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Cayenne Salve…

by guest, Rosalee de la Forêt

 

One of the reasons why exploring herbalism is so much fun is that it goes beyond book work and theory to become more practical and hands on. Herbalism inspires us to get into our kitchens to make powerful herbal remedies.

Exploring herbs in this hands-on fashion also allows us to use our senses when learning about herbs. One of the most important senses in herbalism is our sense of taste.

There are five categories or tastes in herbal medicine: pungent, salty, sour, bitter and sweet.

Even though this recipe isn’t necessarily about tasting an herb, this recipe explores the qualities of the pungent taste. Pungent herbs are hot and stimulating. They get things moving!

cayenne-salve 

Cayenne salve stimulates blood flow, which can decrease pain. Cayenne also blocks substance P, the neuropeptide that can relay the pain signal. This salve can be used externally on arthritic pain, neuropathic pain and old achy injuries.

 

The following recipe is part of the upcoming Taste of Herbs Course.

What you’ll need…

  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • two heaping teaspoons of cayenne powder (or 15 grams)
  • 1/2 ounce of beeswax
  • double boiler
  • cheesecloth

Begin by infusing the cayenne into the olive oil over a double boiler. I heat the oil and cayenne until it is warm, turn off the heat and let it sit (warmly) for about 20 minutes, then turn the heat on again. I do this for at least one hour to a couple of hours; you could do it for 24 hours if desired.

Once the cayenne and olive oil have been infused, strain off the powder through a cheesecloth. Reserve the infused oil.

Heat the beeswax until it is melted. Stir in the infused oil until the beeswax and oil have been thoroughly melted together and combined.

Immediately pour this mixture into jars or tins (it makes roughly 4 ounces). Let it cool and then label it.

 

Using your cayenne salve

This cayenne salve can be used on aches and pains, from sore muscles and joints to bruises and even nerve pain. It is best for closed wounds and may sting a bit on open wounds. Even on closed skin you may feel a bit of burning or heat in the area where it is used. It should be applied externally only and used within 6 months for the best results.

If using it for arthritic pain it may take up to a week or two to see results. In this case you want to use it daily to decrease chronic pain.

Caution: When cayenne comes in contact with your mucosal membranes or eyes it will burn! Be sure to wash your hands thoroughly after touching cayenne or use gloves to apply the salve to the desired area. If you are using the cayenne salve on your hands, consider applying it at night and then sleeping with gloves on.

Some people with thin or sensitive skin may find that cayenne salve causes blistering. If this happens, stop use until it heals, then resume using a smaller amount, or remake the salve using less cayenne.

 

This recipe is an excerpt from the upcoming course, Taste of Herbs. Taste is an amazing way to learn HOW herbs work.

Rosalee created the Taste of Herbs Flavor Wheel to help people learn herbalism using their sense of Taste.

Get the free Taste of Herbs Flavor Wheel here.

 flavorwheel2

 

 

***Rosalee de la Forêt is the creator of Taste of Herbs, a new course by LearningHerbs and Mountain Rose Herbs. Rosalee is a clinical herbalist, herbal educator and founder of Herbal Remedies Advice.

Homestead Happenings…

Who knew caring for a baby would require so much time and effort?  Winking smile  So I’ve spent much of the last 8 months cuddling, ogling and, in general, just adoring my sweet Talitha and her siblings.  Those cute kids, I tell ya!  Who wants to blog when you’ve got 5 adorable distractions to otherwise occupy your time? 

DSCN0738Anyhoo, we’ve been completely enjoying having a new baby in the house.  Things seem so different this time around.  I think mostly my patience has grown.  Remembering back, it seems like there were so many days of raw nerves, lots of coffee and as many Barney movies as I could get my hands on.  These days things aren’t so… intense.  I’m remembering back and cherishing all the moments I rushed past with all my other babies.  These moments are both sad and sweet.  I’m so thankful the Lord has given me the peace and patience to slow down and enjoy each new stage in Talitha’s life.  I just wish I hadn’t been so harried with my others. *sigh*

But the Lord is good and gracious.  My first baby is going to be twelve in a month.  So much time that has sped past me… Don’t get me wrong, I’ve enjoyed these twelve years immensely.  I just wish I’d had, back then, all the knowledge and wisdom the Lord has granted over the course of those twelve years! LOL  I suppose this is the case with most of life.  Anyway, before I sink down deep, let’s switch gears, shall we?

Homestead happenings…

Our little Old Town homestead is staying quite busy fighting off the woodchuck (who’s been known to eat 7 tomatoes in one day!) and brewing up herbal concoctions.  Currently, I’m preparing lots of labels for salves, diaper rash creams, bug bite balms and tea.  Labels are a pain in the hooey!  My printer and word processing program have no desire to cooperate with each other which only produces completely skewed labels.  I’ve had to intervene in less than pleasant ways.  Stupid machines. Smile with tongue out  Let’s see, I also made Bug Bite Balm in the midst of some birthday party craziness.  My sweet friend Danielle had just returned from the jungles of Indonesia and, poor thing!, had bites all over her legs.  So I broke out the plantain and went to work.  I’ll put some up in my etsy store in case any of you are interested.  Plantain is a wonderful plant for bug bites.  If you can identify it easily (which you can.  It’s most likely growing in your yard or sidewalk right now!) you can pinch off a leaf, chew it up and spit it onto a bite or sting for instant relief.  I’ll also be putting some tub tabs and gardener’s salve in the etsy shop.  It’s taken me forever to get that shop up and running but I’m slowly getting there. 

Our latest crafty project was tissue poms.  They are currently hanging from the living and dining room ceilings – all 90 of them.  Surprised smile  Yep, ninety tissue poms.  It took a long time but it was fun!  There are a slew of tutorials out there on how to make them, but these are my favorites:

Don’t go buy a kit to make these!  Go to the Dollar Store and get 2 – 30 ct. packs of tissue paper.  You can get 5 large poms and 10 small ones from that much tissue. 

Oh and before I go I have to share with you my new favorite corner of the web, Pinterest!  Run over and take a peek.  If you get an invite be sure and friend knittingprose!

-knittingprose

Making a salve…

salveThis week I spent some time making a salve for our stand at the farmer’s market.  This salve is a great all purpose salve for bruises, minor scrapes and pains.  Herbs such as comfrey, plantain, calendula make this salve also great for bug bites, dry skin, eczema and other skin rashes as well.  Tea tree oil and lavender give it soothing and antibacterial properties. 

 

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-knittingprose

Making a salve…

salveThis week I spent some time making a salve for our stand at the farmer’s market.  This salve is a great all purpose salve for bruises, minor scrapes and pains.  Herbs such as comfrey, plantain, calendula make this salve also great for bug bites, dry skin, eczema and other skin rashes as well.  Tea tree oil and lavender give it soothing and antibacterial properties.

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