Posts Tagged ‘aprons’

Sheets to skirts…

I love sewing.  I just wish I had more time to do it.  My girls adore the skirts and aprons I make for them and it’s a wonderful way to save on clothing purchases.  A nice long skirt will run you $15 – $30 for a child’s size.  When I have to do some clothes shopping, I’m hoping to get at least 4 pieces of clothing out of that much money!  Well, it’s rare that I do get that many but it’s my target.

I’ve found a great way to get a better deal than that with a little extra effort.  Wanna know my secret?  Continue reading

A couple skirts…

After the success of the twirly skirt I decided to attempt an adult skirt.  I was able to get three crisp white heavy linen sheets at the Goodwill for $2.00 each.  They are perfect – no spot or tear.  I used part of one to make another child’s apron.  This one, though seen here being modeled by my son, was given to my sweet niece. 

My son asked if this apron was made for him and I had to tell him “no”.  So I’ve promised that I will make him one also.  The white one does resemble a butcher’s apron a bit.  Okay maybe not exactly but I’ll come up with a more ‘manly’ apron design for him. 

 

 

 

Another sheet was used to make one of the adult skirts – the second one.  The first one I managed was made using some leftover fabric from my daughter’s bedroom curtains.  lol  Hey, when you have it, use it!  The fabric is pretty thin and not the softest stuff in the world, so I lined the skirt using some soft off-white fabric I found. 

Making skirts without a pattern isn’t the easiest thing in the world… you would think.  I found a great tutorial on it though.  OneCraftyGirl has a super easy patternless A-line skirt tutorial and it really is super easy.   I used this to make skirt #1.  I calculated my waist and added about 5 extra inches of fabric for the waist.  Next I measured my length from my waist to about mid-calf and added a couple inches to that.  Voila!  Instant pattern using the tutorial.  Only thing… I didn’t write any of this down.  I just needed a skirt, drew it directly onto the fabric and cut it out.  Because I made a liner for my skirt I just folded the two sets of material as described in the tutorial and stacked them on top of each other before I cut them, making all the pieces the exact same size.  A little stitching and a whole lot of ironing later…

PICT1783

The second skirt happened a few days later.  I used one of the Goodwill sheets for the skirt and lining.  Knowing I didn’t want just a solid white skirt, a trim of some sort was in order.  A few months ago I had made a bag that I absolutely love and carry daily.  The colors are my favorites – rich blues, greens, browns.  With just a little bit of fabric leftover from that project, I decided this would be the best choice.  Not only were they my favorite colors but with so many colors, I could wear a variety of tops with it. 

PICT1784 The white skirt is longer than the first; it’s ankle-length.  The trim is actually strips I sewed together and then cut into 6 in. long sections giving me a 2 1/2 in. trim length.  I absolutely love this skirt.  Ankle-length skirts are the most comfortable things in the world to wear and with this one, it’s like being wrapped up in a cool, comfy blanket… er, sheet.  : )

I can’t wait to make some more.  I’ll be scouring the Goodwill and yard sales for more pretty sheets over the next few weeks! 

Tops are my next project to tackle, though I don’t think I can do this without a pattern.  Sleeves are very intimidating to me.  We’ll see what I find around the internet this week.

knittingprose

A couple skirts…

After the success of the twirly skirt I decided to attempt an adult skirt.  I was able to get three crisp white heavy linen sheets at the Goodwill for $2.00 each.  They are perfect – no spot or tear.  I used part of one to make another child’s apron.  This one, though seen here being modeled by my son, was given to my sweet niece. 

My son asked if this apron was made for him and I had to tell him “no”.  So I’ve promised that I will make him one also.  The white one does resemble a butcher’s apron a bit.  Okay maybe not exactly but I’ll come up with a more ‘manly’ apron design for him. 

 

 

 

Another sheet was used to make one of the adult skirts – the second one.  The first one I managed was made using some leftover fabric from my daughter’s bedroom curtains.  lol  Hey, when you have it, use it!  The fabric is pretty thin and not the softest stuff in the world, so I lined the skirt using some soft off-white fabric I found. 

Making skirts without a pattern isn’t the easiest thing in the world… you would think.  I found a great tutorial on it though.  OneCraftyGirl has a super easy patternless A-line skirt tutorial and it really is super easy.   I used this to make skirt #1.  I calculated my waist and added about 5 extra inches of fabric for the waist.  Next I measured my length from my waist to about mid-calf and added a couple inches to that.  Voila!  Instant pattern using the tutorial.  Only thing… I didn’t write any of this down.  I just needed a skirt, drew it directly onto the fabric and cut it out.  Because I made a liner for my skirt I just folded the two sets of material as described in the tutorial and stacked them on top of each other before I cut them, making all the pieces the exact same size.  A little stitching and a whole lot of ironing later…

PICT1783

The second skirt happened a few days later.  I used one of the Goodwill sheets for the skirt and lining.  Knowing I didn’t want just a solid white skirt, a trim of some sort was in order.  A few months ago I had made a bag that I absolutely love and carry daily.  The colors are my favorites – rich blues, greens, browns.  With just a little bit of fabric leftover from that project, I decided this would be the best choice.  Not only were they my favorite colors but with so many colors, I could wear a variety of tops with it. 

PICT1784 The white skirt is longer than the first; it’s ankle-length.  The trim is actually strips I sewed together and then cut into 6 in. long sections giving me a 2 1/2 in. trim length.  I absolutely love this skirt.  Ankle-length skirts are the most comfortable things in the world to wear and with this one, it’s like being wrapped up in a cool, comfy blanket… er, sheet.  : )

I can’t wait to make some more.  I’ll be scouring the Goodwill and yard sales for more pretty sheets over the next few weeks! 

Tops are my next project to tackle, though I don’t think I can do this without a pattern.  Sleeves are very intimidating to me.  We’ll see what I find around the internet this week.

knittingprose

Making aprons

This week I made some aprons for my girls.  They are 8 years old and 5 years old.  We have always been committed to teaching our girls to dress modestly and to explaining why they need to do so.  Our oldest girl, Abs, has been having a very difficult time lately with her dress.  It seems that over the past year her weight, and figure in general, has drastically changed.  She’s out growing her clothes quicker than I can afford to replace them!  Not to mention the fact that every seam, ruffle and appliqué drives her batty. 

All these factors have driven me closer and closer to the decision of sewing clothing for the girls.  Now, I am not a sewer by nature.  I’ve sewn straight curtains a couple times for my bare windows, but I’m convinced that anyone can do that with at least a minor bit of success.  Last winter I made my very first sewn item – a bag.  While it’s not perfect, I do love it.  It is the bag I carry every day I go out and others seem to think it looks very well done.  Hey, I’ll accept that as a success! 

Well, I recently received a pattern for a girl’s Edwardian apron from Sense & Sensibility.  I’ve often visited they’re website and drooled over the lovely dresses there.  I would love to sew a comfortable, modest and properly fitting dress for myself and my girls from their patterns.  This apron pattern was a perfect introduction.  I learned some valuable lessons about sewing (like have a seam ripper handy!) and I also gained a little more self confidence. 

PICT1745 The girls are thrilled with their aprons and desirous of more.  Abs is begging for a hand sewn skirt.  I truly believe they desire to express modesty in their clothing, especially Abs.  She’s getting to the age when clothing and looks really start to matter to a girl.  I see her making good choices about what she wears and it’s very difficult when nothing seems to fit.  She gets discouraged at times and I certainly don’t want to lose her to worldly thought and example.  The clothing for little girls offered up in today’s major retail outlets are often nothing more than scraps of cheap fabric fashioned to copy the adult versions.  Modesty is long gone and has been replaced with fad and fashion. 

I firmly believe that my girls (and all of us, for that matter) can like the look of what they  wear, be comfortable, modest and God-honoring.  I’m seriously considering making as many of the girls’ clothes as I can.  Mine too.  I just hope I can produce wearable garments.  The aprons have been a great start, though, and I’m encouraged to try some more. 

There are a ton of apron patterns around the internet for free.

50 free apron patterns

56 free apron patterns